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Tucson Meet Yourself is different from other large events: it is a “folklife” festival. This means that our focus is on presenting artists and communities that carry on living traditions rooted in a group’s own definition of identity, artistry, and cultural significance.

Here are a few additional things about TMY that you may find of interest:

    • By “living”  we mean that, during the other 362 days of the year when there is no TMY festival and they are not on stage, active groups of folks in Tucson by virtue of sharing an ethnicity, a culture, a national origin, an occupation, or another shared interest actually dress, sing, eat, display, and behave in ways that are meaningful to them and that they consider “traditional.”
    • By “folklore” and “folklife” we mean the informal, familiar, common side of the human experience that is not contained in the formal records of culture (what is not in museums nor taught at universities). Folklore is the traditional, unofficial part of Culture. The study of folklore includes language, music, dance, games, myths, customs, handicrafts, architecture, food preparation, jokes and humor, and almost anything else that people say, make or do on their own, informally.
    • By “tradition” and “traditional” we don’t mean “unchanged” or even necessarily “old,” but rather having some basis on being a kind of knowledge that is “transmitted” over time from people to people.
    • By “arts” and “artists” we mean just about any human activity that has an aesthetic component –call it an embellishment of the commonplace. For example, food: everybody has to eat to live (this is commonplace) but some of us cook recipes and prepare foods as an art form.
  • By “folk” and “ethnic” we mean any group of people (cowboys, Mormons, Mexicans, African-Americans, Yaquis, O’odham, gays and lesbians, the deaf, bikers, martial art students, low rider car owners, etc.) who are tied together by some common interest and meaningful system of communication that makes sense to them –the way they talk, cook, dress, decorate objects, dance, etc.

 

The festival has been held each year in Downtown Tucson, Arizona since 1974. TMY was founded by University of Arizona folklorist and anthropologist Dr. James “Big Jim” Griffith, who in 2011 was honored by the National Endowment for the Arts with a prestigious recognition as a “National Heritage” treasure.

 

In addition to the annual festival, TMY leads several other projects year-round.

 

 

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What Others Are Saying

Never before had I found a hotel, anywhere, that would rate an excellent in all categories. I am really too picky for that. But our stay at La Posada del Rio Sonora in Banámichi, Sonora, Mexico, was everything we hoped it would be … and so much more. Excellent on every count is a very fair rating for this wonderful place.
We had spent a quick night there about a year ago and decided to return this month for four days to celebrate our daughter’s 18th birthday. The staff and owners could not have been more helpful and accommodating. It was so relaxing, comfortable, and full of memories that we are already trying to decide when, not if, to return. Soon, I hope.
We all had a great time. Our daughter has so many wonderful memories of her Rio Sonora 18th birthday; we’re pleased we were able to send her off into her own adulthood with a grand celebration.
There were so many highlights of our trip it would be pointless to try to list them all, but a few will remain in our hearts for many years:
• The local staff was warm and nurturing. They treated us like they had invited us into their own homes and made sure we understood “mi casa es tu casa.” How gracious!
• The food at the restaurant was delicious. My favorite was the “caldo de queso,” a regional specialty, and the translucently thin tortillas melted in our mouths at each meal. In our daughter’s honor, they prepared her favorite dish, “sopa de albóndigas,” for the birthday dinner.
• As a birthday surprise the staff produced a beautiful and delicious cake for our celebration, complete with candles.
• Side trips to the nearby hot springs and other rural Rio Sonora villages to mingle and wander were exciting adventures, providing a very warm and secure feeling about the jewels along the river valley.
• The colors of the hotel were complemented by the amazing flora within its inner courtyard and throughout the village; the rooms were comfortably furnished, immaculate, quiet, and each unique with its own tile, accents, trim, and décor.
• Sipping a cool brew or shooting back a “caballito” of the local Bacanora on the terrace overlooking the plaza was a meditative way to end each day.
• Last but not least, the feeling of trust and respect that permeated La Posada – for and from the employees, for the guests, and for the community. Such an atmosphere is far too hard to find anywhere these days.
We are actively recruiting friends and family to join us for another visit to La Posada del Rio Sonora.

Stayed January 2014, traveled with family

Jim C., Glenwood, New Mexico
 
 
 
 

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